Sunday, July 10, 2011

Το Ευρωπαϊκό Δικαστήριο των Δικαιωμάτων του Ανθρώπου
επικύρωσε το δικαίωμα της αντίρρησης συνείδησης
στην στρατιωτική υπηρεσία /

European Court of Human Rights
affirms the right to conscientious objection
to military service



Vahan Bayatyan, outside the Nubarashen Penal Institution
where he was imprisoned as a conscientious objector to military service /
Ο Βαχάν Μπαϊατιάν, έξω από το Σωφρονιστικό Κατάστημα του Νουμπαράσεν

όπου φυλακίστηκε ως αντιρρησίας συνείδησης στην στρατιωτική υπηρεσία



European Court of Human Rights affirms the right to
conscientious objection to military service

Joint statement of Amnesty International, Conscience & Peace Tax International, International Commission of Jurists, Quaker United Nations Office, Geneva, and War Resisters' International

The Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights, in a ground-breaking judgment (issued on Thursday) in the case of Bayatyan v. Armenia (Application no. 23459/03, 1/6/2011), has ruled that states have a duty to respect individuals’ right to conscientious objection to military service as part of their obligation to respect the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion set out in Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights. In the light of this judgment, the above-named organizations call on Turkey and Azerbaijan, the only two parties to the Convention who do not yet provide for conscientious objection to military service, to take immediate steps to do so. Moreover, Armenia should amend its Alternative Service Act to ensure that it provides a genuine alternative service of a clearly civilian nature, which should be neither deterrent nor punitive in character, in line with European and international standards.

This is the first time that the right of conscientious objection to military service has been explicitly recognised under the European Convention on Human Rights.

The above-named organisations welcome this judgment in which the European Court of Human Rights has interpreted this right in line with the long-standing interpretation of the equivalent provisions of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights by the UN Human Rights Committee, the body set up under that treaty to monitor states parties’ compliance with its provisions.

The Bayatyan v Armenia case concerned a Jehovah's Witness who was sentenced to two and a half years in prison following his refusal of military service on the grounds of conscientious objection. Amnesty International, Conscience & Peace Tax International, International Commission of Jurists, Quaker UN Office and War Resisters' International submitted a joint third party intervention (http://quno.org/humanrights/CO/coLinks.htm#QUNOPUB) to the Grand Chamber which highlighted the UN Human Rights Committee's long-standing position that conscientious objection to military service is protected under the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion. The organizations also highlighted recommendations of the Parliamentary Assembly and Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe and provided the Court with information about the recognition of the right to conscientious objection to military service in the 47 member states of the Council of Europe.

Background
The case concerned Armenian conscientious objector Vahan Bahatyan, born in 1983, who lives in Yerevan, Armenia. He is a Jehovah's Witness who for reasons of conscience refused to perform military service. In 2001 he was sentenced to a prison term of one and a half years. His sentence was increased by one year after the Prosecutor appealed for a harsher sentence, claiming that his conscientious objection was “unfounded and dangerous”. When this decision was confirmed by the Armenian Supreme Court, Bayatyan took his case to the European Court.

On accession to the Council of Europe in 2000, Armenia committed itself “to adopt, within three years of accession, a law on alternative service in compliance with European standards and, in the meantime, to pardon all conscientious objectors sentenced to prison terms or service in disciplinary battalions, allowing them instead to choose, when the law on alternative service has come into force, to perform non-armed military service or alternative civilian service”1. The Alternative Service Act of 17 December 2003 made provision for conscientious objectors to military service including the creation of an "Alternative Civilian Service". At no time was Bayatyan given the option of performing this service; moreover those Jehovah's Witnesses who did embark on the service found that it was not clearly civilian in nature and included requirements such as the swearing of a military oath and the wearing of military uniforms that were unacceptable to them. More than 80 Jehovah's Witnesses have been imprisoned in the last four years for refusing this "alternative civilian service", which in its nature, in its duration (42 months, the longest stipulated anywhere in the world, and one-and-three-quarter times that of military service) and in its close supervision by the military authorities, is clearly not in accordance with European and international standards.

This judgment by the 17-person Grand Chamber of the European Court is the result of its review of an October 2009 judgment in the case by a seven-person Chamber which ruled that Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights did not protect conscientious objection to military service.

Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) contain almost identical provisions on the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion. All states which are party to the European Convention are also party to the ICCPR. Since 1993, the UN Human Rights Committee, the body of independent experts established under the ICCPR to monitor states’ compliance with its provisions, has interpreted this as including the right to conscientious objection to military service. This is the first case where the European Court has ruled on this issue. Earlier European Court cases, such as Ulke v Turkey2, where the repeated imprisonment and other penalties imposed on a conscientious objector for the refusal of military service were found to constitute inhuman or degrading treatment, had not addressed conscientious objection to military service as such.

________
1 Opinion No. 221 (2000) of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE): Armenia's application for membership of the Council of Europe, 28 June 2000
2 Ulke v Turkey, Application number 39437/98, Judgment of 24 January 2006




Το Ευρωπαϊκό Δικαστήριο των Δικαιωμάτων του Ανθρώπου επικύρωσε το δικαίωμα της αντίρρησης συνείδησης στη στρατιωτική υπηρεσία

Κοινή Δήλωση της Διεθνούς Αμνηστίας (Amnesty International), της Διεθνούς Φόρου Συνείδησης και Ειρήνης (Conscience & Peace Tax International), της Διεθνούς Επιτροπής Νομομαθών (International Commission of Jurists), του Γραφείου Ηνωμένων Εθνών των Κουάκερων στη Γενεύη (Quaker United Nations Office, Geneva) και της Αντιπολεμικής Διεθνούς (War Resisters International)

Το Τμήμα Μείζονος Σύνθεσης του Ευρωπαϊκού Δικαστηρίου Ανθρωπίνων Δικαιωμάτων, με μια πρωτοποριακής απόφαση (εκδόθηκε την Πέμπτη) στην υπόθεση Bayatyan κατά Αρμενίας (Αρ. Αίτησης 23459/03, 1/6/2011), αποφάσισε ότι τα κράτη έχουν καθήκον να σέβονται το δικαίωμα αντίρρησης συνείδησης στην στρατιωτική υπηρεσία ως μέρος της υποχρέωσής τους να σέβονται το δικαίωμα της ελευθερίας της σκέψης, της συνείδησης και της θρησκείας, όπως ορίζεται στο Άρθρο 9 της Ευρωπαϊκής Σύμβασης για τα Δικαιώματα του Ανθρώπου. Υπό το φως της απόφασης αυτής, οι προαναφερθείσες οργανώσεις καλούν την Τουρκία και το Αζερμπαϊτζάν, τα μόνα δύο μέρη της Σύμβασης που δεν προβλέπουν την αντίρρηση συνείδησης στη στρατιωτική υπηρεσία, να προβούν σε άμεσα βήματα, ώστε να το πράξουν. Επιπλέον, η Αρμενία πρέπει να τροποποιήσει την Νομοθετική Πράξη για την Εναλλακτική Υπηρεσία, ούτως ώστε να διασφαλίσει την παροχή γνήσιας εναλλακτικής υπηρεσίας καθαρά πολιτικής φύσης, η οποία δεν πρέπει να έχει ούτε αποτρεπτικό ούτε τιμωρητικό χαρακτήρα, σε εναρμόνιση με τα ευρωπαϊκά και διεθνή πρότυπα.

Είναι η πρώτη φορά που αναγνωρίζεται ρητά το δικαίωμα της αντίρρησης συνείδησης στη στρατιωτική θητεία υπό την Ευρωπαϊκή Σύμβαση για τα Ανθρώπινα Δικαιώματα.

Οι προαναφερθείσες οργανώσεις καλωσορίζουν την απόφαση αυτή, στην οποία το Ευρωπαϊκό Δικαστήριο Δικαιωμάτων του Ανθρώπου ερμήνευσε αυτό το δικαίωμα σε συμφωνία με την επί μακρόν ερμηνεία των αντίστοιχων διατάξεων του Διεθνούς Συμφώνου για τα Ατομικά και Πολιτικά Δικαιώματα της Επιτροπής Ανθρωπίνων Δικαιωμάτων των Ηνωμένων Εθνών, του φορέα που συστάθηκε βάσει αυτής της συνθήκης για να παρακολουθεί τη συμμόρφωση των κρατών μερών με τις διατάξεις της.

Η υπόθεση Bayatyan κατά Αρμενίας αφορούσε έναν Μάρτυρα του Ιεχωβά, ο οποίος καταδικάστηκε σε 2,5 έτη φυλάκισης, μετά την άρνησή του να υπηρετήσει στρατιωτική θητεία για λόγους αντίρρησης συνείδησης. Η Διεθνής Αμνηστία (Amnesty International), η Διεθνής Φόρου Συνείδησης και Ειρήνης (Conscience & Peace Tax International), η Διεθνής Επιτροπή Νομομαθών (International Commission of Jurists), το Γραφείο Ηνωμένων Εθνών των Κουάκερων στη Γενεύη (Quaker United Nations Office, Geneva) και η Αντιπολεμική Διεθνής (War Resisters International) υπέβαλαν από κοινού παρέμβαση ως τρίτα μέρη στο Τμήμα Μείζονος Σύνθεσης, η οποία τόνισε την επί μακρόν θέση της Επιτροπής Δικαιωμάτων του Ανθρώπου των Ηνωμένων Εθνών ότι η αντίρρηση συνείδησης στη στρατιωτική υπηρεσία προστατεύεται ως μέρος του δικαιώματος στην ελευθερία της σκέψης, της συνείδησης και της θρησκείας. Οι οργανώσεις τόνισαν επίσης τις συστάσεις της Κοινοβουλευτικής Συνέλευσης και της Επιτροπής Υπουργών του Συμβουλίου της Ευρώπης και παρείχαν πληροφορίες στο Δικαστήριο όσον αφορά την αναγνώριση του δικαιώματος στην αντίρρηση συνείδησης στη στρατιωτική υπηρεσία στα 47 κράτη μέλη του Συμβουλίου της Ευρώπης (http://quno.org/humanrights/CO/coLinks.htm#QUNOPUB).

Υπόβαθρο
Η υπόθεση αφορούσε τον Αρμένιο αντιρρησία συνείδησης Vahan Bahatyan, γεννηθέντα το 1983, ο οποίος ζει στο Ερεβάν της Αρμενίας. Πρόκειται για Μάρτυρα του Ιεχωβά που αρνήθηκε για λόγους συνείδησης εκτελέσει τη στρατιωτική του υπηρεσία. Το 2001 καταδικάστηκε σε ποινή φυλάκισης 1,5 έτους. Η ποινή του αυξήθηκε κατά ένα χρόνο, μετά από έφεση που ασκήθηκε από τον Εισαγγελέα για σκληρότερη ποινή, ισχυριζόμενος ότι η αντίρρηση συνείδησης την οποία επικαλέστηκε, ήταν «αβάσιμη και επικίνδυνη». Όταν το Ανώτατο Δικαστήριο της Αρμενίας επικύρωσε την απόφαση αυτή, ο Bayatyan προσέφυγε στο Ευρωπαϊκό Δικαστήριο για την υπόθεσή του.

Με την προσχώρησή της στο Συμβούλιο της Ευρώπης, το 2000, η Αρμενία δεσμεύτηκε «να υιοθετήσει, εντός τριών ετών από την προσχώρηση, νόμο περί εναλλακτικής υπηρεσίας σύμφωνο με τα ευρωπαϊκά πρότυπα και, στο μεταξύ, να αποδώσει χάρη σε όλους τους αντιρρησίες συνείδησης που καταδικάστηκαν σε ποινές φυλάκισης ή υπηρεσίας σε πειθαρχικά τάγματα, επιτρέποντάς τους να επιλέξουν αντί αυτών -όταν ο νόμος περί εναλλακτικής υπηρεσίας τεθεί σε ισχύ- να εκπληρώσουν είτε άοπλη στρατιωτική υπηρεσία είτε εναλλακτική πολιτική υπηρεσία».1 Η Νομοθετική Πράξη για την Εναλλακτική Υπηρεσία της 17ης Δεκεμβρίου 2003 προέβλεψε διάταξη για τους αντιρρησίες συνείδησης στη στρατιωτική υπηρεσία, συμπεριλαμβανομένης της δημιουργίας μίας «Εναλλακτικής Πολιτικής Υπηρεσίας». Ουδέποτε δόθηκε στον Bayatyan η επιλογή να εκπληρώσει αυτή την υπηρεσία· επιπλέον, όσοι Μάρτυρες του Ιεχωβά εκπλήρωσαν αυτή την υπηρεσία, διαπίστωσαν ότι δεν ήταν καθαρά πολιτικής φύσης, και περιελάμβανε απαιτήσεις όπως το να ορκίζονται με στρατιωτικό όρκο και να φορούν στρατιωτική ενδυμασία, τα οποία δεν είναι αποδεκτά από αυτούς. Περισσότεροι από 80 Μάρτυρες του Ιεχωβά έχουν φυλακιστεί τα τελευταία τέσσερα χρόνια λόγω της άρνησής τους να υπηρετήσουν αυτήν την «εναλλακτική πολιτική υπηρεσία», η οποία ξεκάθαρα δεν συμφωνεί με τα ευρωπαϊκά και διεθνή πρότυπα, εξαιτίας της φύσης της, της διάρκειάς της (42 μήνες, η μεγαλύτερη που ορίζεται από κράτος στον κόσμο, και 1 και 3/4 μεγαλύτερη από τη διάρκεια της στρατιωτικής θητείας) και της στενής της εποπτείας από τις στρατιωτικές αρχές.

Αυτή η απόφαση του 17μελούς Τμήματος Μείζονος Σύνθεσης του Ευρωπαϊκού Δικαστηρίου είναι αποτέλεσμα της επανεξέτασης μιας απόφασης του Οκτωβρίου 2009 για την υπόθεση αυτή, από ένα 7μελές Τμήμα το οποίο αποφάνθηκε ότι το Άρθρο 9 της Ευρωπαϊκής Σύμβασης για τα Ανθρώπινα Δικαιώματα δεν προστάτευε την αντίρρηση συνείδησης στη στρατιωτική θητεία.

Το Άρθρο 9 της Ευρωπαϊκής Σύμβασης για τα Δικαιώματα του Ανρθώπου και το Άρθρο 18 του Διεθνούς Συμφώνου για τα Ατομικά και Πολιτικά Δικαιώματα περιέχουν σχεδόν ταυτόσημες διατάξεις για το δικαίωμα στην ελευθερία της σκέψης, της συνείδησης και της θρησκείας. Όλα τα κράτη που είναι μέρη της Ευρωπαϊκής Σύμβασης είναι επίσης μέρη του Διεθνούς Συμφώνου για τα Ατομικά και Πολιτικά Δικαιώματα. Από το 1993, η Επιτροπή Ανθρωπίνων Δικαιωμάτων των Ηνωμένων Εθνών, το σώμα ανεξάρτητων εμπειρογνωμόνων που συστάθηκε από το Διεθνές Σύμφωνο για τα Ατομικά και Πολιτικά Δικαιώματα για να παρακολουθεί τη συμμόρφωση των κρατών με τις διατάξεις του, το έχει ερμηνεύσει ότι περιλαμβάνει το δικαίωμα της αντίρρησης συνείδησης στη στρατιωτική υπηρεσία. Αυτή είναι η πρώτη υπόθεση όπου το Ευρωπαϊκό Δικαστήριο έλαβε απόφαση επί του θέματος. Σε προηγούμενες υποθέσεις του Ευρωπαϊκού Δικαστηρίου -όπως η υπόθεση Ulke κατά Τουρκίας2, όπου κρίθηκε ότι οι επαναλαμβανόμενες φυλακίσεις και άλλες ποινές που επιβλήθηκαν σε αντιρρησία συνείδησης για την άρνησή του να υπηρετήσει στρατιωτική θητεία αποτελούν απάνθρωπη ή ταπεινωτική μεταχείριση- δεν είχε εξεταστεί αυτή καθεαυτή η αντίρρηση συνείδησης στη στρατιωτική υπηρεσία.

________
1 Άποψη Αρ. 221 (2000) της Κοινοβουλευτικής Συνέλευσης του Συμβουλίου της Ευρώπης (PACE): Η αίτηση της Αρμενίας για να καταστή μέλος τους Συμβολίου της Ευρώπης, στις 28 Ιουνίου 2000
2 Ulke κατά Τουρκίας, Αριθμός αίτησης 39437/98, Απόφαση της 24ης Ιανουαρίου 2006



["Το Ευρωπαϊκό Δικαστήριο των Δικαιωμάτων του Ανθρώπου επικύρωσε το δικαίωμα της αντίρρησης συνείδησης στην στρατιωτική υπηρεσία"],
July 7, 2011 / 7 Ιουλίου 2011.
[English/Αγγλικά, PDF]



STRASBOURG, France—On July 7, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) concluded by an overwhelming majority of sixteen votes to one that Armenia violated the right of freedom of conscience of Mr. Vahan Bayatyan, one of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Armenia convicted and imprisoned for his conscientious objection to military service. The ruling marks a defining point in the protection of the rights of conscientious objectors since it reverses the 44-year case law on this issue.

In 2002, Mr. Bayatyan was sentenced to two and a half years’ imprisonment by the Armenian authorities for his refusal to bear arms, a personal decision motivated by his Bible-trained conscience. Armenia’s punitive actions toward Mr. Bayatyan took place despite its previous commitment to the Council of Europe on its accession in January 2001 to institute a genuine civilian alternative service for conscientious objectors and, in the meantime, to pardon all those who had been convicted. Mr. Bayatyan appealed his case to the ECHR, stating that his conviction violated his rights under Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights (“the Convention”). Although a chamber of the Court ruled against Mr. Bayatyan in 2009, the Grand Chamber reversed this decision by holding that “. . .the applicant’s conviction constituted an interference which was not necessary in a democratic society within the meaning of Article 9 of the Convention. Accordingly, there has been a violation of that provision.” The Grand Chamber explained that Article 9 protects “a religious group whose beliefs include the conviction that service, even unarmed, within the military is to be opposed.”

This is the first time in the history of the ECHR that the right to conscientious objection to military service is recognized as being fully protected under Article 9 of the Convention and that, as a result, the imprisonment of a conscientious objector is viewed as a violation of fundamental rights in a democratic society.

This milestone decision now places an obligation on three member states of the Council of Europe—Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Turkey—to stop prosecuting and imprisoning individuals whose deeply held religious convictions do not allow them to engage in military service. The 69 Jehovah’s Witnesses who are now imprisoned as conscientious objectors in Armenia await their immediate release from prison. Witnesses view this landmark judgment as a major step forward in the protection of human rights, hoping that countries like South Korea, where there are currently over 800 conscientious objectors in prison, will release imprisoned conscientious objectors in accord with the current international standard upheld by the European Court.


* JW-media.org,
["Απόφαση-ορόσημο από το Τμήμα Μείζονος Σύνθεσης του Ευρωπαϊκού προστατεύει τα δικαιώματα των αντιρρησιών συνείδησης"],
July 7, 2011 / 7 Ιουλίου 2011.
[English/Αγγλικά, ΗTML]


* UNHCR.org,



No comments: